Train Your Catch to Fetch a Ball

How To Train A Cat To Do Tricks

Training an Old Cat New Tricks

Train Your Catch to Fetch a Ball

Just like humans, the older a cat is, the less likely training will be successful. Always begin training early in the kitten stages of feline development. A kitten is more active at this time and also more curious. So, you can teach your kitten to find a ball or jump over a small object more easily. Try not to teach your kitten tricks that are too far above their mental development levels. Kittens get confused. When kittens are confused, they stop, give you a particular tea-cup stare and you know they just don’t get it.

Feline Observations

Attempts at training any feline to do tricks can be difficult. The first step to achieving this goal is to pay close attention to your cat’s personality. There are as many cat personalities as there are human personalities. Understanding this fact avoids years of frustration. Imagine a human with a personality that is inflexible and adverse to suggestion. Now, you have an idea of what kitty may be like. Oddly, cats are more sensitive to their owners than we realize. This is assuming that the owner has spent a good deal of time with their pet. Cats observe behaviors in a unique way: By watching every move we make and processing their observations to determine their owners moods and habits. Meanwhile, we go blithely amid the kitties thinking they aren’t paying attention. All the while, we are the main focus of their daily curiosities.

Progression Tricks

If your kitten has figured out how to fetch a ball, returning the ball has to be enjoyable for the kitten so it will continue to fetch. Attach a long string to the ball. Toss it into the air. Wait for the kitten to make a run for it. Slowly pull the ball toward you. The kitten will naturally follow it back to you. Be prepared to be very patient. Remember, this is a cat. Tricks should be taught in progression. As an example, to get your cat to roll over, make it follow an object with its eyes. Do this so that the cat rolls from side to side at first and then revolve the object so that the cat has to roll completely over. Practice these tricks again and again. Be aware that the cat may become bored and just decide “enough is enough” and walk away with that bored look. That’s the signal that training for the day is over.

Can A Cat Play Piano?

Can a Cat Play the Piano?

Cats have a keen sense of hearing. They may get a headache if you bang on a drum too loudly. Or, they may fall asleep to your recording of Beethoven’s Moonlight Sonata. A cat with a headache will squint. A bored cat will fall asleep. Cats are more than just mystical creatures. They are hypersensitive to many things humans never notice.

So, can a cat play piano? Yes. If the cat has full and complete trust in its owner, it may be able to play “Three Blind Mice” or, maybe just a few bars of this tune. Initially, cats find no pleasure in striking the ivories with a paw only to get a scary sound for their efforts the first time they try. Hence, the need for complete trust in their owner. Let the cat become acquainted with the piano first. It may well be a place for a short nap in the beginning. That’s okay.

Next, allow the cat to sit in your lap as you play. This breaks down the barrier of fear of noise that’s emitted from the piano. Eventually, every kitty needs a good stretch after napping in your lap. Allow your cat to stretch toward the keys. Don’t force the cat toward the keys. Cats have indelible memories of things that scare them off.

Training Takes Practice

In order for any training with a cat to be successful, it has to be a daily effort or it won’t happen. Practice nonchalantly each day. Remember, your cat is also very smart. Any clue that this is a chore will make kitty unwilling to train at all. Choose tricks that are simple before you try to train a cat to jump through hoops.

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